Double Ratchet Messaging Encryption Used in Encrypted 100% Anonymous Private Messenger

Subscribe and Return Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday for a Dose of Privacy.

ODIN.Chat a Secure, Blockchain-Powered, Decentralized-Messenger

ODIN wants you to own your conversation. Having realized the impending doomsday scenario where massive leaks of personal data lead to real-world consequences, ODIN Blockchain decided to do something about it and built ODIN.Chat, a blockchain-powered, secure messenger with the end user’s privacy in mind.

Preview

Part one of this series explained the Diffie-Hellman key exchange protocol that allows a private conversation via ODIN.Chat without exposing the encrypted key(s) to external parties.

Part two will discuss how a second layer of security — a key derivation function can act in unison with the Diffie-Hellman key exchange protocol allowing for a double ratchet protocol for enhanced messaging encryption.

If you’ve yet to read part one of this series on ODIN.Chat breaking down the Diffie-Hellman key exchange — please do so here.

More Keys and Their Definitions

Key Derivation Function Ratchet (KDF Ratchet) — We define a KDF as a cryptographic function that takes a secret and random KDF key and some input data and returns output data. The output data is indistinguishable from random provided the key isn’t known. (Signal.org)

Layer One: Diffie-Hellman Ratchet

Alice’s initial messages advertise her ratchet public key. Once Bob receives one of these messages, Bob performs a DH ratchet step: He calculates the DH output between Alice’s ratchet public key and his ratchet private key, which equals Alice’s initial DH output. Bob then replaces his ratchet key pair and calculates a new DH output: (Signal.Org)

That looks really secure. Wouldn’t a single ratchet message encryption be enough?

In short, maybe, but let’s discuss the benefits this second layer adds.

When online shopping, for instance, you generate an initial key via the Diffie-Hellman key exchange and in most situations, use that key in all transactions going forward. This single key model isn’t the greatest of ideas when it comes to messaging. Imagine a nefarious party has been tracking your messages for a year in their encrypted state. These stored encrypted messages are piling up while the attacker systematically tries key after key after key. Eventually, whether it be tomorrow or five years from now, they will happen across the correct key, leaving all past, present, and future messages exposed. In the event that your conversation was of high importance — i.e. private discussion with large government figureheads, or the exchange of highly valuable financial information, then the attacker may be incentivized enough to spend the resources necessary to establish the correct key and decrypt all of your conversation.

Layer Two: Adding the Symmetric Key Ratchet

Combining the symmetric-key and DH ratchets gives the Double Ratchet

The recipient applies a DH ratchet step to derive new receiving and sending chain keys. Then she applies a symmetric-key ratchet step to the receiving chain to get the message key for the received message: (Signal.Org)

As previously mentioned, the second layer of security fixes inherent flaws with a single ratchet model. Implementation of a second layer via a double ratchet system allows for the following:

Forward and Backward Secrecy

In the event that a future key is compromised, the current and key are safe thus negating the ability to read present messages. If a past key is compromised, current and future keys are secret. This forward and backward secrecy is often called a self-healing property in cryptography.

Why does this matter?
Let’s consider our earlier example of a private conversation between two parties.

It is incredibly costly to wage war against cryptographic protocols. The malicious parties are incredibly smart and highly motivated to expose vulnerabilities allowing for decryption of conversations. It is therefore advantageous to make the decryption of these messages as hard as possible — negating any incentive to reveal the hidden information.

For instance, suppose I tell you that should you find a way to decrypt this hypothetical conversation, the information will be worth some 1,000,000.00 dollars, and the proposition of doing so will cost 500,000.00 dollars. You have 500,000.00 reasons why you should act this out. Let’s then consider that adding a second layer of encryption makes the proposition of attaining the information no longer 500,000.00 dollars, but 20,000,000.00 dollars. The incentive has been negated it no longer makes sense to go about attacking this. Now in this scenario, you’ve been guaranteed that the information is worth 1,000,000.00 dollars, and the incentive has been built in for you. In nearly all cases, the information in any given message could be useless. You may spend a fortune of time and money on the decryption of a message that says, “Great. Sounds good.” or “Hello.” — not particularly juicy right? That’s the point. We want to make the opportunity cost so high that nefarious parties don’t waste their time.

Thank you for reading! Stay tuned for part three tomorrow!

About the author

Christopher Reeder is ODIN Blockchain’s Lead Content Strategist and Technical Writer. As an advocate and researcher, he is exploring technology’s impact on privacy.

Interested in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Technologies? Join the ODIN community!

All community ongoings and official support take place on the ODIN Reddit. Free to join — get involved now!

Read more about how to get Ø(ODIN) here.

ODIN.CHAT is available now on the Google Play Store.

Breaking Down the Diffie–Hellman Key Exchange

Subscribe and Return Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday for a Dose of Privacy.

ODIN.Chat a Secure, Blockchain-Powered, Decentralized-Messenger.

ODIN wants you to own your conversation. Having realized the impending doomsday scenario where massive leaks of personal data lead to real-world consequences, ODIN Blockchain decided to do something about it and built ODIN.Chat, a blockchain-powered, secure messenger with the end user’s privacy in mind.

Why so many keys? Let’s define some of them.

Randall Duk Kim in The Matrix ReloadedCopyright: © 2003 Warner Bros.

Public key — A public key is created in public key encryption cryptography that uses asymmetric-key encryption algorithms. Public keys are used to convert a message into an unreadable format. Decryption is carried out using a different, but matching, private key. Public and private keys are paired to enable secure communication. (Techopedia.com)

Private key — A private key is a tiny bit of code that is paired with a public key to set off algorithms for text encryption and decryption. It is created as part of public key cryptography during asymmetric-key encryption and used to decrypt and transform a message to a readable format. Public and private keys are paired for secure communication, such as email. (Techopedia.com)

A private key is also known as a secret key.

The list goes on. Some honorable mentions that I’ll address later in future articles include private ephemeral keys, pre key bundles, one time use private keys, key derivation function, symmetric keys, and secret key exchanges.

Alice and Bob want to keep a secret from Eve.

Throughout this article, we’ll be discussing a hypothetical conversation between Alice and Bob who want to keep their conversation private from Eve.

One Way Functions

Think back to your days in elementary school and imagine a series of primary color paints like these:

You’ve got your blue, red, and yellow paint. Very easy to replicate — you could buy another tube of the same color code after all. Let’s take a bit of the blue and yellow, mix it, and we’ve got something entire differently, one of innumerable shades of green.

This is how locks work. Very easy in one direction (the mixing of the primary colored paints) Very difficult in the other (you can’t un-mix mixed colors after all).

Why does this matter? It matters because only the mixer could know the precise amount of the respective yellow and blue paint mixed to create this one-off green.

This brings us to:

Ralph Merkle, Whitfield Diffie, and Martin Hellman.

DiffieHellman key exchange (DH) is a method of securely exchanging cryptographic keys over a public channel and was one of the first public-key protocols as originally conceptualized by Ralph Merkle and named after Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman.

Ralph Merkle conceptualized a public key protocol that Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman [Diffie-Hellman] would go on publish the cryptographic scheme for in 1976 resulting in breakthrough foundational model for cryptographic based communications. (Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange)

Their solution to the problem is reliant on math, but for simplicity sake, I’ll do my best to explain the trick with the previously mentioned paint by color example.

Linked in: Bob and Alice want to have a private conversation that can only be decoded with the use of a mutually shared unique color. To complicate the matter, Bob is in London while Alice is in Los Angeles, so sharing the color offline and in private isn’t an option. How do they go about attaining this color without subjecting it to the prying eyes of Eve?

First, Bob and Alice decide on a publicly available starting color. For this example, let’s say it’s yellow. Bob knows it’s yellow. Alice knows it’s yellow. Eve knows it’s yellow.

Next Alice and Bob both randomly select private colors. Bob chooses blue, and Alice chooses red. They then mix this randomly selected private color and mix it with the publicly known yellow color, thus disguising their private color choice. Eve is not privy to this information.

Now Alice keeps her private color private, and sends her mixed color to Bob, revealing only the mixed color to Eve in the transaction. Bob does the same. His private color remains private and the mixed color public, even to Eve.

This leaves:

Alice with the public color(yellow), her private color(red), her mixed color (some variant of red and yellow), and Bob’s mixed color (some variant of blue and yellow).

Eve with public color(yellow), Alice’s mixed color(some variant of red and yellow), and Bob’s mixed color (some variant of blue and yellow). She still is not privy Alice’s nor Bob’s private color.

Bob with the public color(yellow), his private color(blue), his mixed color(some variant of blue and yellow, and Alice’s mixed color (some variant of red and yellow)

Here’s where the trick happens that allows for both Bob and Alice to have the mutually shared private color that allows for the decryption of their private conversation while leaving Eve utterly dark to the conversation.

Re-read Alice’s and Bob’s respective holdings. They both now hold the exact same information — just mixed in a different order, this is solved when Bob mixes his private color of blue with Alice’s mixed colors of red and yellow, resulting in [blue-red-yellow] and Alice mixes her private color red with Bob’s mixed colors of blue and yellow, resulting in [red-blue-yellow] and a shared private color mixture between Bob and Alice. Eve is left scrambling, grabbing random colors and mixing them with what’s publicly available hoping and praying she’ll come across the right one.

Let’s reexamine this with numbers instead of colors.

Bob and Alice want to have a private conversation that can only be decoded with the use of a mutually shared unique number. To complicate the matter, Bob is in London while Alice is in Los Angeles so sharing the number off line and in private isn’t an option. How do they go about attaining this number without subjecting it to the prying eyes of Eve?

First, Bob and Alice decide on a publicly available starting number. For this example, let’s say it’s 7. Bob knows it’s 7. Alice knows it’s 7. Eve knows it’s 7.

Next Alice and Bob both randomly select private numbers. Bob chooses 4, and Alice chooses 3. They then multiply this randomly selected private number with the publicly known number 7, thus disguising their private number choice. Eve is not privy to this information.

Now Alice keeps her private number private, and sends her multiplied number to Bob, revealing only the multiplied number to Eve in the transaction. Bob does the same. His private number remains private and the multiplied number public, even to Eve.

This leaves:

Alice with the public number(7), her private number(3), her multiplied number(21), and Bob’s multiplied number (28).

Eve with public number(7), Alice’s multiplied number(21), and Bob’s multiplied number (28). She still is not privy Alice’s nor Bob’s private number.

Bob with the public number (7), his private number(4), his multiplied number (28), and Alice’s multiplied number (21)

Here’s where the trick happens that allows for both Bob and Alice to have the mutually shared private number that allows for the decryption of their private conversation while leaving Eve utterly dark to the conversation.

Re-read Alice’s and Bob’s respective holdings. They both now hold the exact same information — just mixed in a different order, this is solved when Bob multiplies his private number of 4 with Alice’s multiplied number of 21 and the public number of 7, resulting in [4x21x7=588] and Alice multiplies her private number 3 with Bob’s multiplied number of 28 and the public number of 7, resulting in [3x28x7=588]. Eve is left scrambling, plugging in random numbers and multiplying them with what’s publicly available hoping and praying she’ll come across the shared private number of 588.

Of course, this example uses smaller numbers resulting in a relatively limited potential answer set and thus a more accessible way by which Eve could guess at the shared private number. However, ODIN.Chat’s core cryptography uses numbers vastly larger, resulting in an effectively unhackable system as even brute force attacks would take an impractically long time.


What makes ODIN.Chat different than the products that claim to be free?

When ODIN Blockchain decided to build a free messenger, we put a lot of thought into what free means not just to us, but to the end-user too. Here’s a list of things we don’t ask for when you use our product: your name, your date of birth, your address, we don’t even ask for your email address, all of which other companies see as revenue when you sign up. We don’t even ask you to create a username and risk being linked to other accounts that might share certain features of that name. It truly is private. We might not be changing the world by ourselves, but we certainly hope to be apart of the group that does.

Thank you for reading! Stay tuned for parts two and three in the coming days!

About the author

Christopher Reeder is ODIN Blockchain’s Lead Content Strategist and Technical Writer. As an advocate and researcher, he is exploring technology’s impact on privacy.

Interested in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Technologies? Join the ODIN community!

All community ongoings and official support take place on the ODIN Reddit. Free to join — get involved now!

Read more about how to get Ø(ODIN) here.

What’s the Difference Anyway? VPN vs VPS

Subscribe and Return Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday for a Dose of Privacy.

Introduction

In a world where throwing around acronyms is equated to your scope of knowledge, I often find completely different technologies referred to interchangeably. Today we will clear up one of the most prevalent, examining the difference between VPNs (Virtual Private Networks) vs. VPS (Virtual Private Servers).

VPN (Virtual Private Network) — virtual private network (VPN) gives you online privacy and anonymity by creating a private network from a public internet connection. VPNs mask your internet protocol (IP) address so your online actions are virtually untraceable. Most important, VPN services establish secure and encrypted connections to provide greater privacy than even a secured Wi-Fi hotspot. (Norton)

VPS (Virtual Private Server) —  A virtual private server (VPS) is a virtual server that the user perceives as a dedicated/private server even though it is installed on a physical computer running multiple operating systems. (Techopedia)

When would I use a VPN vs a VPS and vice versa?

Let’s start with virtual private networks.
Suppose you’re at your local Starbucks with twenty or so minutes to kill while Chad, unironic mustache and all, whips up your caramel frap, extra whip, drizzled with chocolate syrup and you quickly decide to make a dent at the three hundred unread emails loitering in your inbox. You search for the wifi, find it under GreenMermaid777, click to join, and are hit with the ambiguous, “Unsecured Network” message. You don’t hesitate. Dismiss. These emails can’t wait.

Why you might want to use a VPN in this instance?
While joined up to an unsecured network, you’ve made yourself incredibly vulnerable to innumerable data tracking schemes and the maligned persons you may very well be sharing a connection with. Let me explain why. From now on, when you read “unsecured”, don’t wonder whether or not it might be safe, assume it isn’t. When you engage with an unsecured network, the data flowing between your machine and the web are unencrypted and up for grabs.

Well, if the wifi is unsecured, what does a VPN do to secure it?
When using a VPN, your data is not moving freely between your machine and the wifi, but instead is being re-routed through a tunnel of sorts, masking your IP address, and broadcasting the information through the VPN totally encrypted and fully secured. No more prying eyes. No more maligned parties.

I think I’ve got the handle on when to use a VPN and why it works. Let’s talk about virtual private servers.

Virtual private servers are often used by software or web developers to run operations that exceed the capabilities of a single machine. The reason why VPSs are useful in these scenarios is that virtual private servers effectively allow for operations to be running on innumerable virtual environments, each running their own operating system. More operating systems = more replicated operations running parallel to each other without the need for multiple machines.

Virtual private servers are less likely to be used by the average user but are growing in popularity among the more technically inclined as a way out of participating in shared server space (increased risk) without having the buy and run a dedicated server of their own (increased cost).

If you’re still a bit foggy on what exactly a virtual private server does, its okay. It’s unlikely you’re in need of one.

About the author

Christopher Reeder is ODIN Blockchain’s Lead Content Strategist and Technical Writer. As an advocate and researcher, he is exploring technology’s impact on privacy.

Interested in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Technologies? Join the ODIN community!

All community ongoings and official support take place on the ODIN Reddit. Free to join — get involved now!

Read more about how to get Ø(ODIN) here.

ODIN.CHAT is available now on the Google Play Store.

I Asked Reddit’s “r/privacy” What Tools They Use to Protect Themselves— Here’s What They Said.

Subscribe and Return Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday for a Dose of Privacy.

Introduction

We want ODIN to be synonymous with private and secure. We care about our community and are always looking to inform around best practices when it comes to user privacy — regardless of whether the technology stems from our in-house suite of products and services.

The following is for entertainment purposes only.

ODIN CHAT | Anonymous, Private, Secure, Free | Next-Gen MessagingODIN CHAT – Next Gen Anonymous Messaging. Private, secure, forever free, no adverts. Includes a built-in digital…odin.chat

Reddit — The Internet’s Front Page

Reddit can be a massively useful tool if you know where to go. Over the weekend, I popped over to r/privacy to hear what the front page of the internet’s power privacy users had to say when it comes to protecting yourself against big data.

Hardware

You can’t build a great building on a weak foundation. You must have a solid foundation if you’re going to have a strong superstructure. — Gordon B. Hinckley

Starting with premium hardware that avoids data mining bloatware is step one in building a privacy-centric ‘superstructure’. I was surprised that no-one chimed in with the hardware they’re currently using, so I thought I’d throw a wild-card into the ring.

Librem 15 by Purism

Librem 15 – PurismDiscover the Librem 15 The first 15″ laptop designed to protect your digital life The Librem 15 is the first…puri.sm

“The Librem 15 is the first ultra-portable workstation laptop that was designed chip-by-chip, line-by-line, to respect your rights to privacy, security, and freedom. Every hardware and software component — and everything we do — is in line with our belief in respecting your rights to privacy, security, and freedom. We know you will be happy with the results.” — Purism

Why I like it

Three words: Purism Kill Switches

Tired of wondering if your device truly is air-gapped? Is it pinging off of free available local wifi? What does that airplane even mean? Purism made these intrusive thoughts a thing of the past. No more stickers over your camera. Toggle one of two physical hardware switches, and the device’s Bluetooth and wifi signals both inbound and out, as well as the Camera and Microphone, are off.

Now with a physical toggle switch, when your camera and microphone are switched off, you know they are off. Wireless and Bluetooth are combined in a second hardware switch to control all your radio signals inbound and outbound.

Browsers

Web browsers took up a large swath of the discussion around daily privacy protection, no surprise considering the vast majority of the average consumer’s high-risk behaviors will happen within a web browser. Amongst the mainstream contenders, Firefox got the most love.

“Firefox Multi-Account Containers lets you keep parts of your online life separated into color-coded tabs that preserve your privacy. Cookies are separated by container, allowing you to use the web with multiple identities or accounts simultaneously.” -rabicanwoosley

Firefox Multi-Account Containers – Get this Extension for 🦊 Firefox (en-GB)Download Firefox Multi-Account Containers for Firefox. Firefox Multi-Account Containers lets you keep parts of your…addons.mozilla.org

Lesser known, but intensely respected was that of the Tor Browser.The Tor Project | Privacy & Freedom OnlineIf you are in a country where Tor is blocked, you can configure Tor to connect to a bridge during the setup process…www.torproject.org

Software

A few users suggested StandardNotes as being useful for storing written documentation locally on your machine. This logic makes sense considering, it doesn’t matter how secure the means of exchange (email, messenger, file sharing, etc.) is if there remains a point of vulnerability at the source of the document.Standard Notes | A Simple And Private Notes AppYour notes are encrypted and secured so only you can decrypt them. No one but you can read your notes (not even us)…standardnotes.org

What I like about it

Standard Notes is free, makes use of AES-256 encryption, is open source, and available on Mac, Windows, iOS, Android, and Linux. Standard Notes also makes use of both online and offline access, and there is no cap on the number of devices.

Plug-ins

Reddit User, rabicanwoosley suggests uMatrix, described as:

“Point & click to forbid/allow any class of requests made by your browser. Use it to block scripts, iframes, ads, Facebook, etc.”

Basically, it’s a permissions matrix for sub/domains to access web resources by type, think of it a bit like an application firewall inside your browser. It is said to be for more advanced users, it also provides an awesome text-based filter system which is very powerful.

Example pic of GUI: https://i.stack.imgur.com/IIwgX.png” -rabicanwoosley

gorhill/uMatrixDefinitely for advanced users. Keep Github issues for actual bugs. User support is /r/uMatrix. Forked and refactored…github.com

Why I like it

It not only makes your experience more private and secure, but it also makes it more serene. Use this plug-in to ‘automatically prevent any class of requests made by your browser.’

Books

Extreme Privacy

For the past five years, Michael Bazzell has been helping celebrities, billionaires, and everyday citizens disappear completely from public view. He is now known in Hollywood as the guy that “fixes” things. His previous books about privacy were mostly REACTIVE and he focused on ways to hide information, clean up an online presence, and sanitize public records to avoid unwanted exposure. This 370-page textbook is PROACTIVE. It is about starting over. It is the complete guide that he would give to any new client in an extreme situation. It leaves nothing out, and provides explicit details of every step he takes to make someone completely disappear, including document templates and a chronological order of events. The information shared in this book is based on real experiences with his actual clients, and is unlike any content ever released in his other books. The stories are all true, with the exception of changed names, locations, and minor details in order to protect the privacy of those described.


What I learned

People don’t like redundancy and after reflection, I don’t blame them. More than one user came forward with their distaste for my post.

Reddit’s PersonalItern

You can do the research yourself, the questions you’re asking are super basic and with actual effort you can find the answers in this sub by using the search bar.

You’re basically writing an article but you’re too lazy to do the research so you’re asking these basic questions that require minimal effort to find answers to.

Reddit’s billdietrich1

It seems like every week someone announces they’re starting a list. Do we really need 500 lists going over the same ground again and again ?

And beyond some basics, much of your security and privacy is more dependent on your behavior, and that of your friends and family, than on tools. If your friends and family put all your info in their phone and email Contacts lists, all of that info is going to be harvested and sold.

While I initially felt stung by the comments, I mean, ‘I was only here to help spread the word and help people protect their privacy, right?’ I realize that my approach may have been interpreted as last than ideal.

About the author

Christopher Reeder is ODIN Blockchain’s Lead Content Strategist and Technical Writer. As an advocate and researcher, he is exploring technology’s impact on privacy.

Interested in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Technologies? Join the ODIN community!

All community ongoings and official support take place on the ODIN Reddit. Free to join — get involved now!

Read more about how to get Ø(ODIN) here.

ODIN.CHAT is available now on the Google Play Store.

The Problem with Zero-sum Games

Subscribe and Return Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday for a Dose of Privacy.

Definitions

Zero-sum game — a situation in which one person or group can win something only by causing another person or group to lose it. (Merriam-Webster)

The Cannibalistic Behavior Has to Stop

My least favorite part of the crypto-sphere is the interesting phenomena of tribalism and the perception that we’re all playing a zero-sum game. With people investing far more than they can afford to lose, in a hyper volatile and emerging asset class, I can understand the emotional swings. But it just isn’t productive behavior. Just because your platform of choice has a feature that is shared by another, doesn’t mean you’re in direct competition exactly. Let’s examine the traditional non-crypto marketplace and discuss why I think overlap in tech and services is a good thing.

Competition Breeds Innovation

In the United States, we ban monopolistic behavior for a reason. It helps the consumer out by keeping prices dictated by free markets. It also drives competition, which in turn promotes innovation. Why buy a Ford for $25,000.00 when the Chevy will do the same thing plus has better performance, fuel economy, and reliability. In this case, either Ford has to lower the asking price or give you more car for the dollar. Crypto doesn’t have to be any different.

Heres a shortlist of projects with similar objectives:

Disclaimer: This isn’t financial advice. I do not hold any of the to be mentioned coins/tokens other than ODIN.

Social Media
Steemit, Minds, Kin, Sola

Private Messengers
ODIN, Adamant, Loki

Crypto Debit Cards
Bitpay, Coinpayments, UTRUST

Give them a look and as always, do your own research. Support the projects you love and adopt a more pacifistic behavior toward those you don’t.

The Simpson Did It

Give this clip from one of my favorite South Park episodes a look if you’re unfamiliar with where this section received its name.

“Ha! you’re making a dAPP for that?! (insert crypto project here) already did it! Not sure why you’re wasting your time!” -every bag holder on Reddit, 4chan, Discord and Twitter.

Cop outs like this are more a pet peeve a mine than anything else. And if I’m being honest, I think it’s just an excuse for keyboard warriors who are afraid to try anything for fear of failure.

The Simpsons, beloved animated comedy series has had some of the most brilliant television writers to have ever laid finger to key — Heres a shortlist, (Bill Canterbury, Bill Odenkirk, Conan O’Brien, Dana Gould). Keep in mind, none of these names even cracked the top 3 on Ranker’s list. Conan O’Brien and Dana Gould, arguably two of the greatest comic minds in the last forty years didn’t even make the top 15.

This is all to say, yes; some projects are going to get there first. Ethereum, with its all-time high market cap valuation of 122 BILLION dollars, was very attractive to some of the most talented developers and researchers a resulting in a concentration of innovative ideas. While inset your favorite crypto project may have gotten there first, it doesn’t mean an attempt at better execution isn’t worthwhile. It just means they laid the groundwork for the entire ecosphere to improve.

About the author

Christopher Reeder is ODIN Blockchain’s Lead Content Strategist and Technical Writer. As an advocate and researcher, he is exploring technology’s impact on privacy.

Interested in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Technologies? Join the ODIN community!

All community ongoings and official support take place on the ODIN Reddit. Free to join — get involved now!

Read more about how to get Ø(ODIN) here.

ODIN.CHAT is available now on the Google Play Store.

Want to Contribute to the Blockchain Space, but Don’t Know Where to Start? I Have Answers.

Subscribe and Return Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday for a Dose of Privacy.

Who can I expect to find in the Blockchain space?

Developer — A developer is an individual that builds and create software and applications. He or she writes, debugs and executes the source code of a software application

These are as close to deities you’ll find in the space. Honor them.

Lurker — A lurker is someone that follows the forum but doesn’t post.

Enthusiast — A person who does something for a very long time but still sucks at it though he enjoys it very much. Thus, the term enthusiast is given to him as a consolation.

Blogger — Hack writers who, although experts at nothing, feel compelled to share their opinions about everything, often rambling and oversimplifying complex subjects to satisfy an audience of fellow hacks, pseudo-scientists and snobs.

Fanboy — An extreme fan or follower of a particular medium or concept, whether it be sports, television, film directors, video games (the most common usage), etc.

Known for a complete lack of objectivity in relation to their preferred focus. Usually argue with circular logic that they refuse to acknowledge. Arguments or debates with such are usually futile. Every flaw is spun into semi-virtues and everything else, blown to comedic, complimentary proportions.

HODLER — It is someone who does not sell but rather holds on to Bitcoins or other cryptocurrency

The market will moon soon Hodl your coins, always a hodler wins

Technical Analysts — A technical analyst, also known as a chartist or market technician, is someone who will say things like, “Clear sell signal. Bart formation. Supports weak. Might wanna take the money and run.” They also seem to like green candles, but not red ones. Not sure why.

Photo courtesy of: Christopher Reeder [medium.com/@nondescript]

Just create something! Anything.

Despite the perception my definitions may convey, I love this space. It’s unique. Quirky even. I’ve met some brilliant developers who I’m happy to call friends now. I’ve met graphic designers who have blown my mind with what they can do with an image. I’ve met men and women who have shifted my perspective of what’s possible with a conceptual idea. What do they all have in common? They’re contributing. Whether it be code, front end design, think-tank style ideas, they’ve taken it upon themselves to throw their hat into the ring.

Here are some ways to contribute:

  • Publications like this help spread the word in a succinct and articulate way.
  • Write code — it doesn’t have to be earth shattering. Have fun with it.
  • Create cool images and memes.
  • Make video content explaining the projects you’re interested in.
  • Actively participate on Telegram/Discord/Twitter/Reddit.
  • Be constructive in your feedback.
  • If you have an idea — share it. Especially if you can’t execute on it on your own. It’s okay. We all need help. None of us can simply ‘do it all’.

The list is endless. Just find ways you can integrate your passion. For me, it’s writing articles like this.

Creating for creating sake is fun and all, but I’d like to get paid if possible.

I’d say a good majority of the contributors I previously mentioned without a doubt deserve compensation for their ideas. The extended ‘bear market’ has led to cuts across the board in the space. There are, however, potential solutions that help circumvent existing liquidity problems. ODIN Blockchain makes use of one of these solutions. Let me explain.

ODIN’s Masternode Proposal Portal and Superblock Funding

ODIN Blockchain provides a proposal system allowing for community members and external contributors to put forth a proposal for a nominal fee of [50 ODIN Coin] that will then be voted upon by masternode holding community members via the core wallet. This ensures that votes are recorded on the blockchain and funds are released to a wallet address pre-provided by the submitter(s) upon a successful voting round. The ODIN funding the proposal portal is generated monthly via our Superblock. The Superblock will generate up to 108,000.00 ODIN Coin to help fund the previously mentioned proposal portal endeavors.

Let me give you an example. Let’s say you have an idea for an awesome dAPP or series of content, bring it to us at ODIN. Whether it is code, publications, formal translations into a language you’re fluent in, a series of Youtube videos, etc., we welcome all ideas! If you’re reluctant to put forth your contributions without monetary compensation, you can have our community consider and vote to fund your initiative. It passes, great! Commence contributing. It doesn’t, equally great. Make some changes to your proposal based on feedback and give it another go! It’s as simple as that!

Give our Masternode hosting and proposal portal a look today. You might even be inspired by some of our communities existing proposals.

About the author

Christopher Reeder is ODIN Blockchain’s Lead Content Strategist and Technical Writer. As an advocate and researcher, he is exploring technology’s impact on privacy.

Interested in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Technologies? Join the ODIN community!

All community ongoings and official support take place on the ODIN Reddit. Free to join — get involved now!

Read more about how to get Ø(ODIN) here.

ODIN.CHAT is available now on the Google Play Store.

I’m Not a Criminal, Right?

Subscribe and Return Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday for a Dose of Privacy.

Let me explain.

I’ve pitched the idea of ODIN.Chat to anyone who will listen. I can’t express how strongly I believe applications like this are an absolute necessity in 2019. However, when I explain ODIN.Chat to non-crypto enthusiasts I’m almost always met with the same response, “hmmmmm… isn’t that for like … criminals?” As if an expressed interest in privacy is suggestive of character, or lack thereof.

I don’t want to mince words. Reactions like this terrify me, and I hope I can articulate why throughout this article.

Only bad people have stuff to hide, right?

Have you ever been dancing like no one is looking — only to be overcome with embarrassment when it turns out someone is? Well. I haven’t, but that’s something for me to discuss with my therapist. But I’m sure you have. So let’s talk about why that is. From a psychological perspective, embarrassment occurs when there is a threat to ones projected image (Psychology Today). The action itself may be morally neutral, that is to say, you’re not doing anything wrong. I mean we can all agree that dancing when no one is looking is more or less a harmless affair, perhaps even liberating to some. Nonetheless, searing pain to the ego ensues upon realizing your private performance was subject to an audience.

Okay. Someone catches me dancing, so what?

Fair enough. Let’s turn it up a notch.

You’re showing your mom photos from your camera roll. Imagine swiping left twenty or thirty times. Is your heart racing yet? I’m guessing it might be and if it isn’t what if you gave her your phone unlocked and an hour in another room. If it isn’t pounding out of your chest yet, maybe I can put you in touch with my therapist. See sociopathic tendencies.

Well. That that would be a total invasion of my privacy.

Exactly my point. But hold on. I haven’t even started yet.

Remember “The Fappening”? You do. But we can pretend you don’t if that makes you feel better. In late August 2014, an iCloud hack resulted in the intimate photos of dozens of celebrities to be spread online. I won’t name any names, but you know the images. Put yourself in their shoes. Do you still stand behind “well, if I’ve got nothing to hide …” Yeah. I didn’t think so. Let’s move on to the Orwellian dystopia scenario.

1984. A year gone by, but a future we’re destined for.

“Always eyes watching you and the voice enveloping you. Asleep or awake, indoors or out of doors, in the bath or bed — no escape. Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimeters in your skull.” (George Orwell, 1984)

George Orwell’s 1984, an iconic piece of literature tells of Winston Smith and his relentless struggle against what is known only as, The Party. In this dystopian nightmare, Big Brother never relents, and the individual is quite literally never given reprieve from the watchful eye. All dwellings, places of work, and distances between them wrought with cameras and microphones.

“You had to live — did live, from habit that became instinct — in the assumption that every sound you made was overheard, and, except in darkness, every moment scrutinized.” (George Orwell, 1984)

Consider the world we live in today. Within arms reach I can count nine cameras [one on my MacBook, one on either side of my iPhone and Galaxy, two more on each of my iPad and Kindle Fire] Guess what, they all have microphones too. Take a second and do the same. How many do you count?

It isn’t too hard to imagine an authoritarian state forcing the hands of Apple, Samsung, and Amazon into activating some sort of God Mode and thus relinquishing what semblance of privacy remains. Thank whatever higher power it is you believe in we still live in a pseudo-democratic nation.

What do the powers at be have to say about all of this?

Google CEO Eric Schmidt — “If you’re doing something that you don’t want other people to know — maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place”

Former U.S. President Barack Obama — “The only people who don’t want to disclose the truth, are people with something to hide.”

Oh and my personal favorite this series of instant messages by Mark Zuckerberg. Yeah. That Mark Zuckerberg. Founder and CEO of Facebook.

Zuck: Yeah so if you ever need info about anyone at Harvard

Zuck: Just ask.

Zuck: I have over 4,000 emails, pictures, addresses, SNS

[Redacted Friend’s Name]: What? How’d you manage that one?

Zuck: People just submitted it.

Zuck: I don’t know why.

Zuck: They “trust me”

Zuck: Dumb fucks.

Well I guess on an individual level, they must not value their personal privacy, right?

You would think based on what’s been said, that they don’t, but their actions tell another story. Let’s take a look.

Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, after commenting that, “if you’re doing something you didn’t want people to know, maybe you shouldn’t do it” went on to tell his employees not to speak to CNET after they published an article about his life, all of which was sourced via the Google search engine. You can read more in depth about that here.

President Barack Obama — do I really need to go there? I mean, the U.S. wouldn’t classify any information, even if its in the interest of National security if we were to follow his logic. After all, the United States wouldn’t do anything bad, right?

Mark Zuckerberg, the man who calls users of his platform, “Dumb fucks” (his words, not mine) took it upon himself to not just buy a beautiful Palo Alto home with monstrous walls no unaided man could see over. He went on to buy the four houses surrounding it, only to have them demolished, to you guessed it, increase his family’s privacy.

You mentioned something about an application earlier that focused on security and privacy, where can I find out more about that?

ODIN.Chat a Secure, Blockchain-Powered, Decentralized-Messenger.

ODIN wants you to own your conversation. Having realized the impending doomsday scenario where massive leaks of personal data lead to real-world consequences, ODIN Blockchain decided to do something about it and built ODIN.Chat, a blockchain-powered, secure messenger with the end user’s privacy in mind.

What makes ODIN.Chat different than the products that claim to be free?

When ODIN Blockchain decided to build a free messenger, we put a lot of thought into what free means not just to us, but to the end-user too. Here’s a list of things we don’t ask for when you use our product: your name, your date of birth, your address, we don’t even ask for your email address, all of which other companies see as revenue when you sign up. We don’t even ask you to create a username and risk being linked to other accounts that might share certain features of that name. It truly is private. We might not be changing the world by ourselves, but we certainly hope to be apart of the group that does.

About the author

Christopher Reeder is ODIN Blockchain’s Lead Content Strategist and Technical Writer. As an advocate and researcher, he is exploring technology’s impact on privacy.

Interested in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Technologies? Join the ODIN community!

All community ongoings and official support take place on the ODIN Reddit. Free to join — get involved now!

Read more about how to get Ø(ODIN) here.

ODIN.CHAT is available now on the Google Play Store.

Returning Data Ownership to the Individual

Subscribe and Return Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday for a Dose of Privacy.

We’ve entered an era of free, but at what cost?

If you’re anything like me, you’ve never paid for an application. Okay, I take that back. I’ve been persuaded a time or two to opt-in on a freemium model to unlock certain features. But when considering my primary app usage: Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, (you get the picture) I’ve never spent a dime. Now, how can these billion-dollar conglomerates hope to survive while offering you their product free of charge? Well, it turns out that the application isn’t the product; you know what the product is? Yup, you’ve guessed it. It turns out; you’re the product.

No one wants to pay for anything that can be had for free elsewhere. This comes with a variety of trade-offs, and the individual is increasingly at the mercy of this cost-benefit analysis. As the stakes are continually raised, the potential ramifications of signing off on the usage of your data willy-nilly like will most certainly come with real consequences. Let me make this clear. I’m not talking about criminals. I’m talking about school teachers, stay at home moms, doctors, lawyers. Everyone will have to come to terms with what gifting your data means.

These powerhouses of the tech industry have monetized their user base through a variety of data tracking measures and other slight of hand tricks. I’ll speak more to this in, “How Big Business Uses Your Data” found below.

How Big Business Uses Your Data

Did you know consumers will pay a higher net price for a product to get free shipping (Inc.com)? Let me spell that out for you. A consumer, because of how the human psyche has evolved, will happily pay say $25.00 for an item that comes with free shipping, but not $17.50 for the same product if it comes with an additional $5.00 cost for the shipping. How do we know this?

Data tracking.

What does this have to do with the misguided use of my data? Well, explicitly, not much. But this anecdote of human behavior gives us some insight as to how people likely will behave over more extended periods. As I mentioned above, I don’t pay for applications, at least in fiat, but make no mistake, I am paying. I’ve just tricked myself into thinking what is being labeled as free, is in fact, free.

Here are some fun facts you may not have realized when you installed some of the following applications;

Twitter’s terms of service are 34 pages long. Until today, I hadn’t intentionally read a single line. Snapchat’s terms of service is an astounding 8,676 words while Facebook comes in at a modest 3,263 words. This article, in its entirety, for comparison purposes, is just 1,014 words.

I haven’t even gotten started as to what those pages and words mean for their users. Let’s take a look at some of the standouts:

Facebook doesn’t just track your behaviors, they also have insight into your finances. Take a look, “If you use our Products for purchases or other financial transactions (such as when you make a purchase in a game or make a donation), we collect information about the purchase or transaction. This includes payment information, such as your credit or debit card number and other card information; other account and authentication information; and billing, shipping and contact details.” (Facebook terms of service)

If you’re a professional photographer, you might want to think twice about posting to Instagram. Read this over, and then I’ll explain. When you post a photo to Instagram, you’ve agreed that Instagram has “non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license to use their content.” (TheConversation.com)What does this mean? Instagram essentially has the same rights to your photos that you do, potentially putting you, the photographer, in hot water if you’ve signed a contract expressing exclusive licensure to someone else.

I can go on and on of examples just like this, but I’ll save those who want to be spared from the existential crisis a little heartache.

A Potential Solution

With the momentum and general acceptance of the current state of things, it might take some doing to change tides when it comes to owning and managing your data, but I’m happy to say, things are being done around this problem. For example:

ODIN.Chat a Secure, Blockchain-Powered, Decentralized-Messenger.

ODIN wants you to own your conversation. Having realized the impending doomsday scenario where massive leaks of personal data lead to real-world consequences, ODIN Blockchain decided to do something about it and built ODIN.Chat, a blockchain-powered, secure messenger with the end user’s privacy in mind.

What makes ODIN.Chat different than the products that claim to be free?

When ODIN Blockchain decided to build a free messenger, we put a lot of thought into what free means not just to us, but to the end-user too. Here’s a list of things we don’t ask for when you use our product: your name, your date of birth, your address, we don’t even ask for your email address, all of which other companies see as revenue when you sign up. We don’t even ask you to create a username and risk being linked to other accounts that might share certain features of that name. It truly is private. We might not be changing the world by ourselves, but we certainly hope to be apart of the group that does.

About the author

Christopher Reeder is ODIN Blockchain’s Lead Content Strategist and Technical Writer. As an advocate and researcher, he is exploring technology’s impact on privacy.

Interested in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Technologies? Join the ODIN community!

All community ongoings and official support take place on the ODIN Reddit. Free to join — get involved now!

Read more about how to get Ø(ODIN) here.

ODIN.CHAT is available now on the Google Play Store.

Open Source Technology’s Intimate Relationship With Privacy Part 2 of 2

Subscribe and Return Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday for a Dose of Privacy .

Introduction

This article will present part two of a two-part series giving my thoughts and opinions on open source systems and how ODIN Society plans to leverage the benefits of such. Additionally, I hope to highlight some of the projects made possible through open source.

Definitions

Programming Language — A programming language is a set of commands, instructions, and other syntax use to create software programs, like games, web browsers and blockchains. Languages that programmers use to write code are called *“high-level languages.” This code can be compiled into a “low-level language,” which is recognized directly by the computer hardware.(TechTerms.com). Additionally, one could write a program in a low-level language, but this is only done in the event that you really needed the most optimal performance and weren’t able to trust the compiler to do it on your behalf.

  • Examples of high-level languages include C++, Java, Perl, and PHP.

What languages are currently supported by ODIN?

ODIN Blockchain products and services currently make use of a variety of programming languages. The language powering the most important component, the ODIN Blockchain was written in C++. Other examples of languages being used within the ODIN ecosystem include C#, JavaScript, and TypeScript, a superset of Javascript.

What codebase is used within the ODIN ecosphere and where?

ODIN, in its infancy, has already delivered a host of products and services made available to the vibrant community base. Included in this growing list of products and services are ODIN’s flagship application, ODIN.chat and M.A.S.H., an easy to use masternode hosting service. Also, the ODIN Swag Shop where you can pick yourself up cool crypto-related merchandise. Additionally, future products and services such as a proof-of-concept Viking-themed RPG game are currently under development.

Native applications

ODIN.chat → NativeScript, TypeScript, JS
M.A.S.H. → ES6, Vue, Node
P.O.C. Viking RPG → Typescript, C#, Node

Use of external products

ODIN Swag Shop → Ruby on Rails / Liquid / Turbograft

As the ODIN ecosphere continues to grow this will almost certainly coincide with the use of products and services provided through third parties such as Shopify, Medium, and other ‘plug and play’ examples. Outsourcing allows for our core team of developers and contributors to focus on building the products and services the ODIN community deserves. Someday, somewhere, someone will write something very similar to this explaining why their project adopted products like ODIN.chat while seeing their mission through and that puts a smile on my face.

Trust and Transparency

For a blockchain project such as ours, the most important thing is retaining the sense of trust our community has in us. This means continuing to operate in an open and transparent manner and to ‘bake’ those ideals into the very core of work, i.e. the codebase itself. If anyone can read how the system works, then they can see for themselves that we ‘walk the walk’.

Open-sourcing all of our code is just the start. The code itself needs to be improved and extended to support the latest and greatest advancements in security, decentralization, and optimizations. This is a lot of work! With open-source, we can enlist the very best in the world to assist with moving things forward to a brighter future.

Top open source projects

Among some of the top open-source projects are the Linux Kernel, online blog site Word Press, web browser Firefox (Chrome is closed-source, but uses an OS core, Chromium), and widely used operating system Ubuntu.

There are a variety of reasons why products like these exist as open-source variants of the widely used but closed source proprietary options. The main practical reason is that similarly to scientific research, a code solution is proven by peer-review. Often, OS projects are improved dramatically by the input of individuals who agree with the need and see the same potential.

While devs aren’t immune to feeling beyond constructive criticism, the benefits of collaboration far outweigh the consequences. Chief among the emotional motivators is the love for code. It’s an art form and open-sourcing your work is akin to letting the gallery watch as brush meets canvas. There’s a purity in pulling back the curtain.

Broadly Speaking we are Seeing More and More For-Profit Companies Opting to Open Source Projects

Some of the biggest tech companies have opted to open source their code for specific products. Take social media giant, Facebook, for example, open-sourcing parts of their system has positively affected the bottom line for the company. Some estimates have the company saving figures in the billions of dollars by letting the community tinker with, and make improvements upon everything from data management to general interfaces with, Cassandra and React, respectively. (Businessinsider.com)

Are there other benefits to open source your codebase?

Outside of the previously mentioned monetary advantages of open sourcing your code, there are a plethora of other reasons why big business could and probably should, at times opt for an open-source approach.

Increased size in qualified candidate base:
Imagine the following scenarios where a tech giant is bringing in a prospective candidate for a technical interview.

Scenario 1: The codebase is closed and proprietary. Sure, it used a lot of common commands, and the infrastructure is reasonably familiar to the candidate, but they’ve never gotten their hands filthy with this exact codebase. The interviewee may be asked to complete a series of objectives that involve problem-solving and manipulation of the code base, but how much can be done you’re simultaneously learning, exploring, and playing all while under the pressure of the scenario. Did the prospective employer get a good picture of the candidate’s technical capability? Probably not.

Scenario 2: The codebase is open source and freely accessible to the public. The prospective employee spent weeks tinkering with the code base, testing its’ limits, identifying flaws, and being inspired by past builds. The employee is brought in for their interview, and instead of spending valuable time in the exploration phase, they’re ready to have meaningful conversations, demonstrate competency, and perhaps give constructive feedback on the existing codebase with an articulation of how they feel their contributions will positively affect the project.

Security:

People make a living exploring the vulnerabilities of a system. You’re not doing yourself a favor when you limit the number of eyes on any given codebase. Oversight happens. Open-sourcing your project exposes the potential vulnerabilities to a broader set of eyes, thus allowing for earlier recognition and the potential to avoid critical foundational flaws.

Longevity:

Consider this: more than 90% of startups fail. This is a fact. Recognizing that this will occur allows a more rational approach when considering open vs. closed source options. Imagine a startup offers a proprietary solution for an ongoing problem you or your company has. You don’t know how it works, you just do. Your business or personal project is thriving. You have a growing customer audience base. All because of the solution provided by the proprietary software. You’re happy. Suddenly that hot new tech startup went belly up on you. Your initial problem resurfaces. You reach out for tech support. You get a dial tone since, of course, why would any bankrupt company provide ongoing support? You’re likely looking at hiring someone freelance, but good luck with that because, remember, this is closed source stuff. So now what you’re really looking at is a costly migration or start from scratch approach with a different platform. Either way, this won’t be pretty.

Conversely, you opt for an open-source solution from the start. The problem occurs, and you’re met with a bevy of options. You can source the vast network of competent developers who have worked on the issue for a quick fix. You can opt for the previous build without the flaw specific to your problem. You can reach out to a third-party support service provider and pay a premium, which admittedly isn’t fun, but is a viable option nonetheless. You’ve now solved your problem and never once had to face the existential threat of your business or personal project suffering because of something out of your control.

I recognize there are certainly arguments to be made for both open and closed source solutions, but I see more utility in open source.

About the author

Christopher Reeder is ODIN Blockchain’s Lead Content Strategist and Technical Writer. As an advocate and researcher, he is exploring technology’s impact on privacy.

Interested in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Technologies? Join the ODIN community!

All community ongoings and official support take place on the ODIN Reddit. Free to join — get involved now!

Read more about how to get Ø(ODIN) here.

ODIN.CHAT is available now on the Google Play Store.

Open Source Technology’s Intimate Relationship With Privacy Part 1 of 2

Subscribe and Return Every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday for a Dose of Privacy .

Introduction

This article intends to give my thoughts and opinions on open source systems and how ODIN Society, the governing body of ODIN Blockchain plans to leverage the benefits of such.

Definitions

ODIN Society — a non-profit co-operative organization owned and operated by its members.

Open Source — pertaining to or denoting a product or system whose origins, formula, design, etc., are freely accessible to the public. (Dictionary.com)

Cooperative — a jointly owned enterprise engaging in the production or distribution of goods or the supplying of services, operated by its members for their mutual benefit (Dictionary.com)

GitHub Repository — A repository is like a folder for your project. Your project’s repository contains all of your project’s files and stores each file’s revision history. You can also discuss and manage your project’s work within the repository.(GitHub.com)

Why does it matter?

Knowledge Sharing

“Two heads are better than one, not because either is infallible, but because they are unlikely to go wrong in the same direction.” — C.S. Lewis

The human mind is the most powerful tool in the known universe, and the old adage that two heads are better than one has stuck for a reason. Scale this to ten minds, a hundred, a million, and what do you have? Keen insight, shifts in perspective, competition, and collaboration all working in unison at advancing a goal.

It doesn’t matter whether you’re building a car or a killer new blockchain-powered app like odin.chat being able to access quality information from other talented minds simply helps.

Project Longevity

Markets rise and fall. We’ve seen what a proper bubble can do to the tech industry. Unfortunately, this means that promising concepts, products, and the core code powering them often sink with the ship, and for what? Liquidity issues? The poaching of top talent? This is a shame.

Open source eliminates, or at very least, diminishes the fall out of events such as these and that’s what matters. So when the company goes bust, or your lead dev rides off into the sunset with Google, the product lives on just waiting for the next set of talented hands to pick her up.

Exposure to Outside Talent

Human talent is unquantifiable. However, the idea that it does, in fact, hold value isn’t up for debate. Given this, logic would follow that exposure to the largest number of contributors is in an entities best interest supposing their ideals are altruistic in nature.

In 1991 an unknown student, Linus Torvalds, studying computer science at the University of Helsinki wasn’t satisfied with the stock operating system running his IBM personal computer. So what did he do? Well, like any average person, he set out to build his own. Three years later, and with the help of some 100+ developers, version 1.0 of the Linux kernel was released. (LinuxTrainingAcademy.com)

Fast forward some eighteen years and you see countless entities from single person for fun projects to top ten Fortune Five Hundred companies building on top of the Linux kernel. This was all possible because Linus opted for open source and the desire to leave the world a little better than it was.

Who’s doing open source today?

I’ll save you a bit of reading. EVERYBODY (excuse the hyperbole) is doing it these days. Facebook, Twitter, Google, IBM, Adobe, Samsung, [you get the picture] all make use of immense talent in the open-source world in one way or another.

Check out this article, 35 Top Open Source Companies, to learn more about how big tech companies are leveraging the benefits of open source development.

Previewing part two

While part one of this two-part series presented some pretty high-level concepts, I plan on doing a deeper dive on the technical front in part two. Stay tuned and don’t forget to follow me on Medium, and ODIN on all other channels to be among the first to read my articles.

About the author

Christopher Reeder is ODIN Blockchain’s Lead Content Strategist and Technical Writer. As an advocate and researcher, he is exploring technology’s impact on privacy.

Interested in Blockchain and Cryptocurrency Technologies? Join the ODIN community!

All community ongoings and official support take place on the ODIN Reddit. Free to join — get involved now!

Read more about how to get Ø(ODIN) here.

ODIN.CHAT is available now on the Google Play Store.